After-hours care T. 770-446-0929 / Fax 770-446-6977

After-hours care T. 770-446-0929 / Fax 770-446-6977

Improve Office Brushing Habits

Post a sticky note on your desk or computer as a reminder to brush teeth after lunch.
Brush teeth right after lunch, before you become absorbed in work.
Store your toothbrush and toothpaste at work in a convenient and handy place.
Make brushing your teeth part of your freshening-up routine at work.
When brushing at the office or away from home, it’s important to make an extra effort to keep your toothbrush germ-free.

Should I Brush at Work?

Definitely, but most Americans don’t brush during the workday. Yet a survey by Oral-B Laboratories and the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) shows if you keep a toothbrush at work, the chances you will brush during the day increase by 65 percent.
Getting the debris off teeth right away stops sugary snacks from turning to damaging acids and catches starchy foods like potato chips before they turn to cavity-causing sugar. If you brush with fluoride toothpaste in the morning and before going to bed, you don’t even need to use toothpaste at work. You can just brush and rinse before heading back to your desk. If you don’t have a toothbrush, rinsing your mouth with water for 30 seconds after lunch also helps.

How Do Electric Toothbrushes Work?

Electric toothbrushes generally work by using tufts of nylon bristles to stimulate gums and clean teeth in an oscillating, or rotary, motion. Some tufts are arranged in a circular pattern, while others have the traditional shape of several bristles lined up on a row. When first using an electric toothbrush, expect some bleeding from your gums. The bleeding will stop when you learn to control the brush and your gums become healthier. Children under the age of 10 should be supervised when using an electric toothbrush. Avoid mashing the tufts against your teeth in an effort to clean them. Use light force and slow movements, and allow the electric bristle action to do its job.
Toothpaste